Ask the Experts: Windows

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Ask StephanieVanderbiltStephanie Vanderbilt | Coastal Windows & Exteriors
978 304-0495 | mycoastalwindows.com

When should I replace my windows?
You should always replace your windows if they are single pane, which is very inefficient. Many windows that were installed in the ’80s and ’90s are old technology and aren’t saving energy like new technology units do. Signs that you need to replace a window include feeling cold sitting next to your window, broken seals, or if it is tough to open and close.

What are the best materials for replacement windows?
Vinyl has been the mainstay over the years because of its affordability. Consider the thickness of the vinyl as a gauge of quality. One hundred percent virgin vinyl windows are more energy efficient, drastically lower drafts into the home, are easy to maintain, and last a lifetime. With new machinery and technology, high-end vinyl windows offer stunning looks in wood-grain or painted styles.

How do I choose the right windows for my home?
Questions to ask yourself: Is energy efficiency important? Then look for an Energy Star window with a low U-factor. Do you have drafty windows that need replacing or is this about beauty/looks? What type of warranty is offered? Are safety and security important? Make sure your window has a triple lock system and is endorsed by the National Crime Prevention Council.

What are the latest trends in energy efficiency?
The newest technology concerns the coatings on the glass that reflect warm air back into the home, referred to as low-e, which stands for low emissivity. They are not visible to the naked eye but can save homeowners a great deal on their heating bills. In New England, the low-e coatings help passively heat the home during the winter. 

Ask IanDobbsIan Dobbs | Pella Windows & Doors
800 866-9886 | pellanewengland.com

When should I replace my windows?
Customers replace their windows for many different reasons, most commonly for energy efficiency, but aesthetics are almost as important to most customers.

What are the best materials for replacement windows?
There is no best material for windows. Each material has its own features, benefits, and advantages. Pella offers seven window lines that encompass almost every material used to build windows so that our customers can choose based on their needs and wants.

How do I choose the right windows for my home?
We encourage customers to view samples in our showrooms to find the right window or door for their home. Our representatives also discuss the varying installation methods available to properly accommodate the customer’s home and choice.

What are the latest trends in energy efficiency?
Pella has the Insynctive line of motorized shades and blinds for between the glass and over the window. Between the glass units are available with a solar battery pack that qualifies for a federal tax credit and allows our customers to open and close their window shades via a cell phone app or remote control so they maximize energy efficiency through solar heat gain/loss.

Ask AlanBeasleyAlan Beasley | Ricci Lumber
603 436-7480 | riccilumber.com

When should I replace my windows?
When you start to get fogging in between the panes of glass from seal failure and air is seeping in between the two panes. Older windows that have a single pane of glass. Or when balances do not work any longer or the ropes and pulleys do not operate as they should.

What are the best materials for replacement windows?
Vinyl is the most common material in replacement windows. Depending on the situation, such as a historical appearance requirement, you may need to use a wood window or a clad window, which would have wood interior with aluminum or vinyl outside.

How do I choose the right windows for my home?
Start by consulting with your local window showroom. We can help you select the right product. An associate can come by your site to make sure that your choices will work. We can also arrange to have one of our professional installers do your window installation for you.

What are the latest trends in energy efficiency?
Advances in window technology have come a long way in the past five to 10 years. Energy efficiency is a high priority. The most common system used is low-e film with argon gas between the panes. This process protects your house and furnishings from the sun’s heat and UV rays in the summer and helps retain heat in the winter months.

Ask Rick PiersonRick Pierson | Selectwood
800 922-5655 | selectwood.com

When should I replace my windows?
It depends on what type of windows you have. I recommend doing a yearly inspection. Things you want to look for are seal failure, stress cracks on the glass, any exterior joints that may be separating, possibly any peeling or flaking paint that may indicate a rot issue. And also check the mechanisms of the windows to make sure they are functioning properly.

What are the best materials for replacement windows?
Right now, fiberglass is gaining a lot of traction. The expansion of the fiberglass works in union with the glass itself, which offers longevity. It doesn’t rot, and you can paint it.

How do I choose the right windows for my home?
You want to look for windows that minimize the amount of materials used on the exterior. This is because paint will fade at different rates on different materials. Look at fit and finish. You want to look for the least number of pathways for water and wind to enter. The style of your house will dictate how you want the final product to look. Record evaluation. If you should don’t know enough about your topic area, Wikipedia is actually a perfect resource to write my essay for me reviews easily study all you should know to start

What are the latest trends in energy efficiency?
In general, this is becoming less of a selling point. Here in the Northeast, we’re trying to focus on solar heat gain. Low-e2 has been the standard for this area, but now manufacturers are trying to maximize the sun exposure and use windows that allow you to have the most solar heat gain.

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