The Artist’s Garden

A social worker changes her life with gardens and glass

 Lincoln CloseUpGlassPhotographed by Kerry Michaels Creating textured yet transparent panels of glass allows Gregory to bring the outside indoors.

Many gardeners cultivate flowers for their beauty and visual excitement and grow vegetables for the wholesome nourishment that they provide. Stained-glass artist Layne Gregory does all that and more. She attributes her satisfaction in gardening to her former career as a social worker. “I enjoy creating relationships,” says Gregory, who lives at Lincoln Farm in Falmouth, Maine.

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Fragrant Houseplants

Bring the scents of nature indoors

Frag CitrusPhotographed by Kindra Clineff A crowd pleaser, calamondin orange (x Citrofortunella microcarpa) produces a bounty of
delicious citrus fruit indoors.

During the growing season, coastal gardeners court sensory overload. With flowerbeds framing the horizon, wind fingering their hair, the suffused colors of flowers misted by ocean fogs, and the perfume of blossoms bantered around by sea breezes, the senses have it made.

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Between a rock and a hard place

A rocky relationship this gardener would not change

Boy Patio WaterfallPhotographed by Kindra Clineff Not long after Sarah Boynton was gifted with the waterfall of her dreams, she added a terrace to the back patio so the family could dine serenaded by water music.

Sarah Boynton did not know what she was getting into when she moved to Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1990. Besides the three large rhododendrons on the premises, the acre stretching around the house was pretty much engulfed in brambles and disguised in mystery. Who knew what was hidden under the camouflage? “I continually got poison ivy cleaning it up,” she says about her first year in residence. Nonetheless, she persisted in ripping plants out, tearing at invasives, and clearing the land around the house. Fortunately, all that hard work resulted in the reward of her dreams—she hit rock.

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Future Perfect

Plant bulbs this fall for bright spring blooms

P Crocus2Photographed by Kerry Michaels Tommies, Crocus tommasinianus, are tough, spreading, and pest resistant.

Call it what you will—jaw-dropping, car-stopping, splendiferous—the sight of spring-flowering bulbs in bloom warms hearts chilled by long Seacoast winters. But growing the likes of daffodils, tulips, Siberian squill, ornamental onions, and crown imperial requires advance planning. Spring-flowering bulbs need fall planting because that is when they produce their roots; they also need extended cold to trigger the chemical process causing them to bloom.

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A Garden Evolution

One couple’s garden unfolds room by room

Scz MainEntrance 233Photographed by Kindra Clineff

Some country gardens bring to mind a vision of cheery flowers in bountiful beds or borders, but Jill and Dan Sczepanski’s one-acre garden in Rowley, Massachusetts, unveils its style and beauty room by room. The progression through these spaces is so structured and so unexpected that you have to move slowly to absorb the full impact of what you see.

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Halls Pond Gardens

A tapestry of plants

Hall 325Photographed by Kerry Michaels Jovibarba hirta, Sedum album, and Sedum sexangulare scramble over and among the rocks, creating a tapestry of textures in a palette of greens and reds.

Some gardens are grand because they are big and blousy, stuffed full of flowers and foliage. Some are elegant and minimalist—edited to their bare bones. Then there are the gardens that reveal themselves slowly, and you only discover their artistry and unique personality on closer inspection. Take, for example, Mark Brandhorst’s Halls Pond Gardens. Located off the beaten track, three miles from the center of South Paris, Maine, Halls Pond Gardens is easy to overlook, but this jewel box of a garden is well worth the trek.

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Grow Your Own Food

Compact vegetable varieties save space

MV Tomato SuperSauce 17294 BurpeeHomeGardensPhotography courtesy of burpeehomegardens.com Grow Super Sauce tomatoes in a big container with ample staking to accommodate their large size.

Story after story touts the ease and benefits of growing your own food. The reasons—including the profound satisfaction of harvesting homegrown vegetables and herbs—are convincing. “Why wouldn’t you choose to grow your own vegetables, especially ones that are high in nutrition?” says Joe Lamp’l, host of national public television’s Growing a Greener World, an award-winning show featuring organic gardening, green living, and farm-to-table cuisine. “People want to grow their own food because they want more control over what goes into their bodies and where their food comes from. There’s a risk when you don’t know how your food is produced.”

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Summer Dreams

A challenging backyard becomes the perfect escape

Karosis Pool Spa 2Photographed by Rob Karosis The homeowners chose a classically inspired design for the pool area, which is seen in the shape of the pool, the tiled deck, and the portico columns.

It seemed like a simple request: add a pool and outdoor entertainment area to the backyard of a Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, home. However, one look at the site told a different story—the yard was a steeply sloped hillside with nary a flat spot in sight. Was a pool even possible?

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The View

A garden makes a bridge between house and sea

Karlin MesslerGarden 325Photographed by Lynn Karlin Lilies and straight white pines frame a view of Penobscot Bay and Camden.

Good things come to those who wait, and Dyke Messler and his partner Rickey Celentano waited more than seven years for their house and garden to be completed. These good things include a view of Penobscot Bay that goes on forever, a bungalow built in the spirit of the Arts and Crafts home of Messler’s grandparents, and a garden that is a masterpiece of place.

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Creating a Rock Garden

creatingarockgarden

Photographed by Kindra Clineff

Although vacationers flock in summer to Rye’s beaches, Wallis Sands and Jenness, for cool water and hot sand, there is more to this town’s terrain than the seashore—there is also abundant granite ledge, the most familiar intrusive igneous rock, which appears in vast outcroppings throughout the Northeast and chiefly in New Hampshire. The mineral grains of granite, easily visible, give the rock its characteristic speckled look.

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English Garden Essentials

Traditions and tips for creating a coastal English garden

EnglishGarden

The principles of English garden design have deep roots in America. As a result, much of what Americans do in the garden is in the English style, with plants and design elements that many gardeners take for granted. English-style gardens may include lawn areas, perennial beds, rock gardens, vines, flowering shrubs, and trees that stand tall and mark the property line.

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Snug Harbor Farm

You’re in for a tweet

SHF Table ribbon Wreaths 2Photographed by Kindra Clineff/Styling by Terry John Woods

Snug Harbor Farm in Kennebunk, Maine, might not have a partridge in a pear tree or turtle doves (yet), but owner Tony Elliott has the six geese a-laying all sewn up with a whole lot of hooves, twigs, and nostalgia thrown in.

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The Beach Rose

A prickly Seacoast survivor

Rosa 62408095 BurningLightPhotographyPhotograph by Burning Light Photography

Saltspray rose, seaside rose, dune rose, beach rose—by any name, it is as common as sea grass on the coast, as iconic as a lighthouse on a cliff. Flourishing up and down North America’s northeastern seaboard, this rose is so naturalized on the shores of New England that it seems like a native. It grows as wildly as weeds on the prairie. But in fact, this rampant rose is an import, and a relatively recent one at that. Indigenous to the Far East, it was unknown in the West until the late eighteenth century, when a Swedish botanist by the name of Carl Peter Thunberg first spotted it in Japan. Charmed by its crinkly petals and serrated leaves, he called it Rosa rugosa, or “wrinkled rose.”

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All in Good Taste

Unexpected details add spice to a luxuriant formal garden

Morris 8318aPhotographed by Kerry Michaels
This lush mixed border contains a red Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) found as a seedling at Donna’s great aunt’s house, porcupine grass (Miscanthus ‘Strictus’), and a weeping katsura (Cercidiphyllum japonicum f. pendulum)

Fourteen years ago, when plant collectors Doug and Donna Morris went house shopping, they knew exactly what they wanted. "When we were looking for a house, we were really looking for a yard, and the house just happened to fit us," Doug says of the property they bought in Salisbury, Massachusetts. The lot—Doug and Donna's future garden—measured just over one-third of an acre and came with a historic Greek Revival house. David Moody, a carpenter, built the clapboard cape in 1846 along with the surrounding homes, but the Morris's dwelling was where Moody lived.

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A Brilliant Restoration

Walek Garden1 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Buffer It! JoomShareBar Artist Michael Walek renews his historic property in York, Maine Photographed by Kindra Clineff Nobody does color like Michael Walek. He painted the exterior of his home, Chase House, the blush of dawn with a hint of canyon. It is the glow of the noonday sun on the petal of a dewy David Austin rose, combined with the juicy flesh of a newly sliced melon. No, this is not a Victorian painted lady. We are talking about a humble Federal house circa...

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Hot Stuff!

Create garden sizzle with bold tropical plants

Trop Timber MultiGarden1

Have you dreamed of gardening in the tropics, where giant leaves and brilliant yellow, orange, red, hot pink, and magenta flowers bloom in glaring sun? Well, you don’t have to live near the equator to enjoy the magic of tropical plants. Bananas, elephant ears, cannas, ginger, and many other tropicals can thrive on the Seacoast as annuals with adequate sun, moisture, and decent soil. Tropical plants bring fun to gardening with intoxicating hues and wild textural contrasts that turn everyday borders of perennials and grasses into grand displays.

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